Friday, October 22, 2010

Brice House (Photographs)

42 East Street
Annapolis, Maryland

The Brice House is one of three large, brick, and quite similarly designed, Georgian houses in Annapolis (the others being the William Paca and the Hammond-Harwood Houses). According to various sources, all three are haunted, but the best information I have found so far, attests to the haunting of the Brice House. The house was erected between 1766 and 1773 by Colonel James Brice who would later serve two-terms as mayor of Annapolis and acting governor for the state of Maryland in 1792. The house remained in the family until the 1870s and passed through other private hands until the 1920s when St. John's College purchased it. Restoration began in the 1950s under private ownership. The house is now owned by the International Masonry Institute which uses the flanking pavilions. The main house is occasionally open for tours. The house was named a National Historic Landmark in 1970.

Recent view of the Brice House taken in 2009. The house
is made up of five parts, the large main house, two
pavilions with "hyphens" that connect the pavilions
to the main house. Photo by Wikipedia user, Pubdog.
Courtesy of Wikipedia.

First floor reception hall and staircase. Two of the spirits seen
in this house have been indentified as one of the sons of Col.
Brice and his manservant. The elderly son is said to have been
murdered by the manservant. Photo taken for the Historic American
Buildings Survey (HABS). Courtesy of the Library of Congress,
Prints and Photographs Division.

Dining Room. The spirit of James Brice is said to be wandering
this house, possibly checking up on the upkeep of his manse.
Photo taken for the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS). Courtesy
of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Ballroom. The spirit of a young woman has been seen frequently
in the house wandering from room to room. During restoration work
in the 1970s, a skeleton of a woman was discovered in a sealed, closet-like room.
Photo taken for the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS). Courtesy of the
Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

The ballroom from a different angle. Photo taken for the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS). Courtesy of the Library of Congress,
Prints and Photographs Division.
 Sources
Brice House (Annapolis, Maryland). Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed
     22 October 2010.
Heintzelman, Patricia. National Register of Historic Places Nomination form for the
     Brice House. Listed 15 April 1970.
Jarvis, Sharon. Dead Zones. NYC: Warner Book, 1992.

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