Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Haunted South Carolina Lighthouses

In the study of ghosts, particularly in North America, lighthouses appear frequently. I’m not sure about why these beacons for the living play such a role in the world of the dead, but they appear with noticeable regularity. In the United States, the bulk of the attention on haunted lighthouses concern those of the mid-Atlantic and New England states as well as Michigan’s Great Lakes lighthouses, though, there are some quite prominent haunted Southern lighthouses. Among them, the St. Augustine and Pensacola lighthouses in Florida, both of which have been investigated by TAPS, the ghost hunting organization featured on the TV show, Ghost Hunters. In fact, the investigation of the St. Augustine Lighthouse featured the ghost hunters chasing something up and down the stairs of the lighthouse itself.

This is part I of a series that will highlight the haunted lighthouses of the South, both the well-known and the little known.

Hilton Head Rear Range Light
Arthur Hill Golf Course, Palmetto Dunes Resort
Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

The most southern of all of South Carolina’s lighthouses, the Hilton Head Rear Range Light is the only remaining of two lights that guided shipping in Port Royal Sound. With the front light, which was mounted on the roof of a lighthouse keeper’s cottage a mile away, these lights could be lined up by the navigators of ships to provide the safest route into port.

This light is also the only cast-iron lighthouse remaining in the state. It was constructed between 1879 and 1880 and lit for the first time in 1880. The light consists of a cast-iron skeleton and the stair tower (originally clad in wood, but clad in iron sheeting probably around 1913) topped by a wooden watch room and lantern room. The cast-iron skeleton bolts the structure in place to a  series of concrete bases. The complex also included a keeper’s cottage, but it was moved to Harbour Town in the Sea Pines Plantation resort complex in the 1980s. The light itself was decommissioned in 1932 and the lighthouse was restored with the building of the Palmetto Dunes Resort.

Some 18 years after it was first lit, during the height of a tremendous hurricane, Adam Fripp, the lighthouse keeper and his daughter, Caroline, stayed in the lantern room tending the light. A gale shattered the glass in the lamp extinguishing it. At the same moment, Mr. Fripp keeled over with a massive heart attack. At her father’s urging, 20 year old Caroline continued tending the light and did so without her beloved father following his death. Exhausted by the work and probably grief, young Caroline died three weeks later. Wearing the blue gown she was wearing the night of the hurricane, her spirit has been seen and her sobs and wails have been heard in and around the lighthouse and the, now separated, keeper’s house. Terrance Zepke’s Ghosts of the Carolina Coast recounts a story of a young couple who encountered a young woman wearing a blue dress one stormy evening. She climbed in the back seat of their car soaking wet and the couple drove on. When the wife turned to speak to the young woman, the back seat was empty, though covered with water.

Cape Romain Lighthouse
Lighthouse Island
Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge
McClellanville, South Carolina

Situated on a lonely barrier island, the Cape Romain Lighthouse is the perfectly place for a lonely spirit to walk. The lighthouse has an older sibling standing nearby that is the oldest extant lighthouse in South Carolina. The first Cape Romain lighthouse is 65 feet high and was constructed in 1827 to guide mariners past the dangerous Cape Romain Shoals. The light burned until 1857 when its much taller sibling, soaring 150 feet, was constructed with slave labor. Like Pisa’s famous tower, the taller Cape Romain Lighthouse began to lean in the late nineteenth century. The tilt became so precarious that the Fresnel lens had to be adjusted to function properly. The lens was replaced in 1931 and the lighthouse was automated in 1937. Ten years later, the lighthouse was decommissioned and the light went dark. Since that time, the keeper’s quarters and outbuildings have disappeared leaving only the two towers standing mute. The Fish and Wildlife Service, which operates the surrounding refuge, still maintains the pair of lighthouses.

The lighthouses of Cape Romain. Courtesy of the US Coast Guard
Historic Light Stations Database.

The lonely setting of these now mute sentinels plays a significant part in its legend. Most likely in the late nineteenth century, a Norwegian man named Fischer was the keeper and lived on Lighthouse Island with his wife. Fischer’s wife continuously begged her husband’s permission to leave the island and return to Norway for a visit, but he refused. One evening, Fischer was so angered by his wife that he plunged a knife into his wife’s breast and buried her body near the lighthouse. Those asking about his wife’s whereabouts were told that she had become despondent from the loneliness and had committed suicide. On his deathbed, Fischer confessed to his wife’s murder and lighthouse keepers thereafter tended to the grave on the lonely island. Over time, a spirit was heard ascending the 195 steps of the lighthouse tower. Additionally bloodstains inside the keeper’s cottage could not be scrubbed away.

August Fredreich Wichmann, one of the keepers in the early twentieth century reported hearing the sounds of footsteps in the tower many times. Wichmann’s son, who was born at the lighthouse believes the footsteps are from Fischer’s wife. If the footsteps are still heard, the only things to hear them are the goats that live around the island and the seabirds that wheel around the tower.

Georgetown Light
North Island
Georgetown, South Carolina

Winyah Bay at the end of the eighteenth and into the nineteenth centuries was vital to American trade. To aid ships passing into this bay, the Georgetown Light was constructed first in 1801. This cypress tower did not last long and had to be replaced in 1806 after being toppled in a gale. Some six years later, the current 87 foot brick tower was constructed. It is now the oldest active lighthouse in South Carolina.

Georgetown Light. Courtesy of the US Coast Guard Historic
Light Stations Database.

Two reports of ghosts come from this light. Bruce Roberts and Ray Jones in their Southeastern Lighthouses: Outer Banks to Cape Florida report that footsteps are heard in the tower, though no indication is given as to the identity of the spirit. The second story, in Terrance Zepke’s Ghosts of the Carolina Coast, however, is more interesting. Mariners tend to be a very superstitious bunch and this is indicated in this legend of a warning spirit attached to this lighthouse. Apparently, a lighthouse keeper and his young daughter had ventured into Georgetown, some miles south of the light. As they returned, a storm blew in and the young girl was tossed into the water. Her father jumped in to rescue her but she was lost. The lighthouse keeper survived and following his death, he and his daughter were seen rowing a small boat in Winyah Bay. Local mariners always took their appearance as a sign of a storm blowing in.

Sources
Bansemer, Roger. Bansemer’s Book of Carolina and Georgia
     Lighthouses. Sarasota, FL: Pineapple Press, 2000.
Califf, John, III. National Register of Historic Places Nomination
     form for the Georgetown Light. Listed 30 December 1974.
DeWire, Eleanore and Daniel E. Dempster. Lighthouses of
     the South: Your Guide to the Lighthouses of Virginia, North
     Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Stillwater,
     MN: Voyageur Press, 2004.
Elizabeth, Norma and Bruce Roberts. Lighthouse Ghosts:
     13 Bone Fide Apparitions Standing Watch Over America’s
     Shores. Birmingham, AL: Crane Hill, 1999.
Hilton Head Range Rear Light. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia
     Accessed 18 October 2010.
Huntsinger, Elizabeth Robertson. More Ghosts of Georgetown.
     Winston-Salem, NC: John F. Blair, 1998.
Lee, Charles E. National Register of Historic Places Nomination
     form for the Cape Romain Lighthouses. Listed 12 November 1981.
Roberts, Bruce and Ray Jones. Southeastern Lighthouses:
     Outer Banks to Cape Florida. Philadelphia: Chelsea House,
     2000.
Wells, John E. National Register of Historic Places Nomination
     form for the Hilton Head Rear Range Light. Listed 12 December
     1985.
Zepke, Terrance. Ghosts of the Carolina Coasts: Haunted
     Lighthouses, Plantations, and Other Historic Sites. Sarasota,
     FL: Pineapple Press, 2000.

No comments:

Post a Comment