Saturday, September 10, 2011

A Handful of Haunts--Photos from New Orleans

Labor Day Weekend was wild and wooley for New Orleans with Tropical Storm Lee hitting the city at the same time as numerous revelers for Southern Decadence and other events. A friend of mine, Benjamin Lewis, was able to take pics of a handful of haunted sites and I'm most grateful to him for these marvelous images!

Beauregard-Keyes House
1113 Chartres Street


A bright spot of sunshine on a dreary day, the Beauregard-
Keyes House, 2011. Photo by Benjamin Lewis, all rights reserved.


One of the most famous homes in the city, the Beauregard-Keyes House has served as the residence for a number of famous names including Confederate General P. T. G. Beauregard, chess master Paul Morphy and novelist Frances Keyes. Events in this house have ranged from glittering balls to a bloody Sicilian mafia massacre in the early 20th century. Gun shots from the massacre are still heard, a waltzing couple seen inside while some have heard the name of General Beauregard's Waterloo, Shiloh, being repeated over and over again. One resident even claimed to have encountered the battle of Shiloh being fought in the ballroom. I've covered this site in depth in two entries (Part I and Part II).


Sign at the front of the Beauregard-Keyes
House, 2011. Photo by Benjamin Lewis,
all rights reserved,


Le Richelieu
1234 Chartres Street


Front entrance to Le Richelieu, 2011.
Photo by Benjamin Lewis, all rights
reserved.
Housed in two buildings, one dating from 1845, the other from 1902, the Le Richelieu Hotel occupies the site where five French patriots were executed in the late 18th century. The spirits of these five men may still reside here.

The two buildings that comprise Le Richelieu, 2011. Photo by
Benjamin Lewis, all rights reserved.
A view of Le Richelieu from Barracks Street, 2011. Photo by
Benjamin Lewis, all rights reserved.
Looking down this hallway at Le Richelieu one
can almost imagine the Shining Twins appearing
here. Photo by Benjamin Lewis, all rights reserved.
Courtyard and pool where a group of Spanish soldiers may
have been executed. Do their spirits still wander here?
Photo by Benjamin Lewis, all rights reserved.


Old United States Mint
400 Esplanade


Front entrance to the old US Mint, now
the Louisiana State Museum, 2011. Photo
by Benjamin Lewis, all rights reserved.
From 1838 to 1909, this building housed the New Orleans Mint, producing currency in all denominations. Since its closure as a mint, the building served a variety of functions until 1981 when it became a part of the State Museum of Louisiana, the capacity in which it functions today. In the second floor gallery a man in blue coveralls has been seen rolling a cigarette. He then places the cigarette into his mouth and walks into a nearby wall.

View down the length of the facade, 2011. Photo by Benjamin Lewis,
all rights reserved.
The massive old mint, 2011. Photo by Benjamin Lewis, all
rights reserved.
The rear of the old mint building, 2011. Photo by Benjamin Lewis,
all rights reserved.


Old Ursuline Convent
1100 Chartres Street


Plaque on the old convent, 2011. Photo by Benjamin Lewis,
all rights reserved.
One of the oldest buildings in New Orleans, the Old Ursuline Convent has survived hurricanes, fires and the nuns have lent aid during plagues and epidemics. It's no surprise that their old convent would house spirits. According to Jeff Dwyer, the spirits of Ursuline sisters have been seen gliding throughout the building while the spirit of a Civil War era soldier has been seen in the garden.

A brooding sky over the Old Ursuline Convent, 2011. Photo
by Benjamin Lewis, all rights reserved.
Sources
Dwyer, Jeff. Ghost Hunter's Guide to New Orleans.Gretna, LA: Pelican Press,
     2007.
New Orleans Mint. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed 10 September
     2011.
Powell, Lewis IV. "Beauregard-Keyes House, Part I." Southern Spirit Guide. 
     3 December 2010.
Powell, Lewis IV. "Beauregard-Keyes House, Part II." Southern Spirit Guide. 
     6 December 2010.
Smith, Katherine. Journey Into Darkness...Ghosts and Vampires of New 
     Orleans. New Orleans: De Simonin Publications, 1998. 

3 comments:

  1. I'm glad you could use them, Lewis. I had a blast taking them. :o)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Great Photographs. There is no place like New Orleans to capture haunted and haunting photographs.

    ReplyDelete